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Ten Earth Imps

L’appel du vide - the call of the void; the imp of the perverse.

gailsimone:

papercanary:

geersart:

Bat signal
parody of that Spider-man parody.

hahaha

Okay. THAT IS FUNNY.

Cute.

gailsimone:

papercanary:

geersart:

Bat signal

parody of that Spider-man parody.

hahaha




Okay. THAT IS FUNNY.

Cute.

Tagged with:  #Batwoman

APE IN A CAPE: Avengers Question for Females

gailsimone:

Anyone identifying as female is more than welcome to answer…

I was having a conversation with a very talented and successful comics artist about how comics companies in the past and even currently sometimes seem to actively push away female readers. He agreed, and cited the Avengers movie (which…

1) That Black Widow wasn’t treated as a sex object, but as a capable figure from the “interrogation” scene where she kicked butt and took names.  2) There were no “brotastic” bonding moments where the guys did creepy leering at women or creepy “we must save the helpless chicks” as a shared experience. Also - I don’t recall any of this specific scene, but it would appeal to me - dudes sharing with each other an acknowledgement of how cool/strong/capable a female character is: a “Dude. Check out her kick butt style.”

gailsimone:

fybirdsofprey:


From Birds of Prey Vol.2 #13

The sass between these two is amazing!  Ugh the writing in BoP just makes me want to drool…


This would be just perfect. Gosh, I would buy so many of these comics that are on Gail’s wishlist. I love The Question.

gailsimone:

fybirdsofprey:

From Birds of Prey Vol.2 #13

The sass between these two is amazing!  Ugh the writing in BoP just makes me want to drool…

This would be just perfect. Gosh, I would buy so many of these comics that are on Gail’s wishlist. I love The Question.

APE IN A CAPE: Guys!

gailsimone:

I promise. DC did a nice thing here. A happy thing, and there’s more news coming I can’t tell yet, but soon. ALL good news.

Some opportunities have opened up all over the place and soon I will be writing some of my very very favorite characters that I have never written before, AND I will be…

COOL. If Gail is happy to stick around and keep writing, I’m happy to stick around to keep reading. I’m thrilled; Barbara Gordon has always been my dream girl.

Writings and other things

I’ve been fairly inactive on Tumblr these days, mainly because I participated in NaNoWriMo and managed to “finish” the 50,000 word challenge. I have not finished the actual novel, however, although the project is much closer to being finished. I will finish it in 2013, and I will publish it. I have no doubt of that, now. 2013 is going to be an interesting year, for sure.

1 year ago

Tagged with:  #writing

APE IN A CAPE: Non-Update Update

gailsimone:

Guys, I know I owe a million responses.

I’m not kidding…my email makes a little bong sound and for the last few days, it’s sounded like this bongbongbongbongbongbongbongbongbong. Just endlessly. Everyone has called, executives and editors from every company. My DM box on twitter was filling up so…

Gail Simone says - “Can’t say anything yet, but I will say that I’ve been offered to write some dream, dream books I never even thought I might be able to work on.”

COOL. COOL. COOL. That I cannot wait for. That definitely makes up for losing her on Batgirl. Wherever you’re going, Gail, I’ll follow along.

APE IN A CAPE: Antitheism

gailsimone:

I am both a skeptic and an atheist myself, and I think everyone’s entitled to their opinions.

But being either or both of those things is no guarantee that you are a decent human being with empathy and compassion. Neither of those things comes with a license to treat people who believe differently like shit.

The atheism and skeptical movements are rife through with privilege all the way up to the top writers in both groups.  There is a common tendency for them to fail utterly and lapse into xenophobia, misogyny, racism, privilege denial and lots, lots more. 

We are entitled to our opinions. I don’t think we’re entitled to be assholes.

Well said.

APE IN A CAPE: Hypothetical Question

gailsimone:

And this is GENUINELY hypothetical, I post it because I think it’s interesting for readers to face the kind of odd scenarios that actually happen pretty regularly for comic book and other writers of licensed characters.

Okay, you are a writer, you have a name for writing licensed characters,…

That’s a really tough one.  I would go with b) “Avoid the characters even if you really love them because of the canon addition” - and I would make it really clear to the people offering me a job why I was doing that. If it’s something I felt strongly about, I wouldn’t want my name attached to the character publicly, because I would always feel like it was a tacit endorsement of the wrong direction that character was made to go in. Writing is about more than the characters that I love, it’s also about the messages I’m trying to convey to the world about what I believe in, and if the character is off in a direction I don’t believe in, I couldn’t do it.

APE IN A CAPE: A Slightly Frustrating Thing...

gailsimone:

…about the wonderful http://eschergirls.tumblr.com/ and http://thehawkeyeinitiative.com/ .

I think these sites do something hilarious, something I’ve tried to do my whole online history, which I think of as ‘mocktivism,’ that is, activism by mockery. You showcase how absurd something is, you…

awesome. This.

gailsimone:

sweaterkittensahoy:

Gail Simone is recommending the Cerebus sale at Comixology. I have never read Cerebus, but Dave Sim, its creator, is a noted misogynist,  so it’s hugely disconcerting to see Gail Simone backing his work.
I sort of understand Simone’s tweeting of it because it’s a book that means a lot in the continuity of comics and is—from everyone I’ve known who’s read it—a very good story. But Sim refers to women as “voids” and defined that as “without a glimmer of understanding of intellectual processes.” He accused Jeff Smith (creator of Bone) of being dominated by his wife, and when Smith called him out on it, challenged Smith to a boxing match to, I assume, prove his manliness.
And I look at Simone supporting the sale of this book, and I understand its historical significance in comic book history (the first fully self-published title to take off), and I understand that it’s known for being a truly epic, well-done story, and I think of the Tony Harris apologists who say he’s not actually calling out “real” geek girls, and I wonder if one of the main reasons sexism persists so hard in comics is because high-ranking people in the industry—specifically, one of the most recognized women in the industry—back the sale of a book by a man who has referred to everyone of her gender as “without a glimmer of intellectual processes.” 
Recently, I was talking to a buddy of mine about some reservations I had on a writer change on a comic, and I said I wanted to give it a few issues to see how I felt even though the early news was making me twitchy, and my buddy said, “I’m going to tell you something I think a lot of comic readers need to hear.”
“What’s that?”
“You don’t owe them shit.”
Dave Sim wrote an epic comic. That is impressive. It is, by all accounts, a good story. That is also impressive. But you don’t owe him your time or money just because he pulled it off. You don’t owe him your attention and glimmers of intellectual processes (if you’re a man because we ladies are “voids”). You don’t owe him shit.
Gail Simone has written some of the most-enjoyed comics in the last decade, including a great run on Birds of Prey, the enjoyable Welcome to Tranquility, and a loved run on Suicide Squad. You may have read one or all of these and really enjoyed them. You may really respect her talent and skill. You don’t owe her shit.

Ick.
First, no, no reader owes me anything. Who ever said or implied such a thing? No one owes me a damn thing and I didn’t ask anything of anyone, either.
And it was Secret Six I wrote, the beloved run on Suicide Squad was by John Ostrander.
Do I think my mentioning that Cerebus is available digitally is one of the reasons “sexism persists so hard in the industry?” No, I think that’s a pretty goofy assertion.
The implication seems to be that I apologize for Dave Sim’s misogynist horseshit, or that I defend it, in some way. I do not. When Dave was on his previous ‘internet tour,’ big name creators lined up to kiss his ass, and precisely two known mainstream creators addressed him directly about his ridiculous and offensive statements. Myself and Pia Guerra.
You’ll be happy to know I got a ton of tsk-tsking about that, as well.
Dave Sim’s current philosophies are fairy dust mixed with bullshit mixed with gender rage on a massive scale. They do not lend themselves well to honest defense or apologies. The comments you quote are just a tip of a very depressing iceberg.
The issues Dave is making available digitally, to my mind, constitute a masterwork of comics. They are so good, there are only a handful of North American comics that can compete with them. When I was a kid, for a long time, I could only afford one comic a month, and that comic was Cerebus.The story being reprinted, HIGH SOCIETY, is possibly my favorite single comics story ever.
Some time much, much later, Dave Sim lost touch with reality. I’m not saying he became mentally ill, I don’t know and don’t want to guess. But he became what I think is a pretty tragic figure. I think his ideas are loathsome and contemptible, but I also think they are not entirely dissimilar from what you hear from a lot of street corner prophets.
Does that mean that the work he did before this break, where he routinely had some of the most fascinating female characters in comics, is tainted? Does that work now have implications of misogyny no one saw at the time?
For me, and I thought long and hard on this, the answer is no. I reread the early volumes and they still are tremendously good comics. But I expect my followers are intelligent people who can make their own choice.
The big questions are, and I think it’s perfectly fair to struggle with them…is great art still great art if it’s sexist?  Is art created by an artist before a personality breakdown to be lumped in with later work?  Is buying work that you find valuable and meaningful an endorsement of an artist’s much later-stated views?
I don’t tell people not to enjoy or purchase work by an artist because I find their views offensive. I don’t feel I have any authority whatsoever to do that. Like any other rational person, I make those judgments for myself, and myself only.
I have a lot of followers. Some might have gotten some enjoyment and value out of those early Cerebus books. My views on Dave Sim are ridiculously well-documented, I’ve never shied away from condemning his nonsense. I will continue to do so. I absolutely respect the opinions of anyone who doesn’t want to read these books based on Sim’s later rants.
But if someone were to ask me what comics to study to learn meaningful sequential storytelling, Cerebus would likely be in the top two or three choices I would recommend.
My followers are adults, I full expect they can make up their own minds, and I knew some would be interested. I am not going to judge them either way.

The big questions are, and I think it’s perfectly fair to struggle with them…is great art still great art if it’s sexist?  Is art created by an artist before a personality breakdown to be lumped in with later work?  Is buying work that you find valuable and meaningful an endorsement of an artist’s much later-stated views?
I would answer these as 1) No, 2) yes, 2) yes.
I love Gail, but I don’t think this is defensible.

gailsimone:

sweaterkittensahoy:

Gail Simone is recommending the Cerebus sale at Comixology. I have never read Cerebus, but Dave Sim, its creator, is a noted misogynist,  so it’s hugely disconcerting to see Gail Simone backing his work.

I sort of understand Simone’s tweeting of it because it’s a book that means a lot in the continuity of comics and is—from everyone I’ve known who’s read it—a very good story. But Sim refers to women as “voids” and defined that as “without a glimmer of understanding of intellectual processes.” He accused Jeff Smith (creator of Bone) of being dominated by his wife, and when Smith called him out on it, challenged Smith to a boxing match to, I assume, prove his manliness.

And I look at Simone supporting the sale of this book, and I understand its historical significance in comic book history (the first fully self-published title to take off), and I understand that it’s known for being a truly epic, well-done story, and I think of the Tony Harris apologists who say he’s not actually calling out “real” geek girls, and I wonder if one of the main reasons sexism persists so hard in comics is because high-ranking people in the industry—specifically, one of the most recognized women in the industry—back the sale of a book by a man who has referred to everyone of her gender as “without a glimmer of intellectual processes.” 

Recently, I was talking to a buddy of mine about some reservations I had on a writer change on a comic, and I said I wanted to give it a few issues to see how I felt even though the early news was making me twitchy, and my buddy said, “I’m going to tell you something I think a lot of comic readers need to hear.”

“What’s that?”

“You don’t owe them shit.”

Dave Sim wrote an epic comic. That is impressive. It is, by all accounts, a good story. That is also impressive. But you don’t owe him your time or money just because he pulled it off. You don’t owe him your attention and glimmers of intellectual processes (if you’re a man because we ladies are “voids”). You don’t owe him shit.

Gail Simone has written some of the most-enjoyed comics in the last decade, including a great run on Birds of Prey, the enjoyable Welcome to Tranquility, and a loved run on Suicide Squad. You may have read one or all of these and really enjoyed them. You may really respect her talent and skill. You don’t owe her shit.

Ick.

First, no, no reader owes me anything. Who ever said or implied such a thing? No one owes me a damn thing and I didn’t ask anything of anyone, either.

And it was Secret Six I wrote, the beloved run on Suicide Squad was by John Ostrander.

Do I think my mentioning that Cerebus is available digitally is one of the reasons “sexism persists so hard in the industry?” No, I think that’s a pretty goofy assertion.

The implication seems to be that I apologize for Dave Sim’s misogynist horseshit, or that I defend it, in some way. I do not. When Dave was on his previous ‘internet tour,’ big name creators lined up to kiss his ass, and precisely two known mainstream creators addressed him directly about his ridiculous and offensive statements. Myself and Pia Guerra.

You’ll be happy to know I got a ton of tsk-tsking about that, as well.

Dave Sim’s current philosophies are fairy dust mixed with bullshit mixed with gender rage on a massive scale. They do not lend themselves well to honest defense or apologies. The comments you quote are just a tip of a very depressing iceberg.

The issues Dave is making available digitally, to my mind, constitute a masterwork of comics. They are so good, there are only a handful of North American comics that can compete with them. When I was a kid, for a long time, I could only afford one comic a month, and that comic was Cerebus.The story being reprinted, HIGH SOCIETY, is possibly my favorite single comics story ever.

Some time much, much later, Dave Sim lost touch with reality. I’m not saying he became mentally ill, I don’t know and don’t want to guess. But he became what I think is a pretty tragic figure. I think his ideas are loathsome and contemptible, but I also think they are not entirely dissimilar from what you hear from a lot of street corner prophets.

Does that mean that the work he did before this break, where he routinely had some of the most fascinating female characters in comics, is tainted? Does that work now have implications of misogyny no one saw at the time?

For me, and I thought long and hard on this, the answer is no. I reread the early volumes and they still are tremendously good comics. But I expect my followers are intelligent people who can make their own choice.

The big questions are, and I think it’s perfectly fair to struggle with them…is great art still great art if it’s sexist?  Is art created by an artist before a personality breakdown to be lumped in with later work?  Is buying work that you find valuable and meaningful an endorsement of an artist’s much later-stated views?

I don’t tell people not to enjoy or purchase work by an artist because I find their views offensive. I don’t feel I have any authority whatsoever to do that. Like any other rational person, I make those judgments for myself, and myself only.

I have a lot of followers. Some might have gotten some enjoyment and value out of those early Cerebus books. My views on Dave Sim are ridiculously well-documented, I’ve never shied away from condemning his nonsense. I will continue to do so. I absolutely respect the opinions of anyone who doesn’t want to read these books based on Sim’s later rants.

But if someone were to ask me what comics to study to learn meaningful sequential storytelling, Cerebus would likely be in the top two or three choices I would recommend.

My followers are adults, I full expect they can make up their own minds, and I knew some would be interested. I am not going to judge them either way.

The big questions are, and I think it’s perfectly fair to struggle with them…is great art still great art if it’s sexist?  Is art created by an artist before a personality breakdown to be lumped in with later work?  Is buying work that you find valuable and meaningful an endorsement of an artist’s much later-stated views?

I would answer these as 1) No, 2) yes, 2) yes.

I love Gail, but I don’t think this is defensible.